The Post-16 provision at The Grove, caters for students with a primary diagnosis of complex or moderate autism with a range of associated learning difficulties. Students already at The Grove will be prioritised for places as opposed to external referrals as long as their needs meet the admissions criteria.

The key aim within our post-16 provision is that our students become independent in both their academic learning and their personal skills. We support our students in becoming as independent as possible, keeping in mind their specific needs and difficulties and we provide a safe bridge between secondary school and adult life. We do this through operating as independently as possible from the main school so that students can experience “transition towards adulthood” in every sense, including physicality.

We will build on previous learning in life and self-help skills so that each individual becomes more prepared for the transition to adulthood. It is our aim that all our students learn to become as independent as possible and acquire the tools to be able to manage the daily challenges of life beyond school. All our work is designed around the ambitions and hopes of the young people, working towards their future destinations as outlined in their Education Health Care plan and their Transition towards Adulthood plan.

In our post-16, we will take a completely personalised approach to learning. The curriculum is fully flexible to meet individual’s skills and abilities supported by continued therapeutic input. Each student has a timetable that reflects their targets and goals for the future, their skills, and their interests. We offer different pathways which are flexible to each student’s need. Pathways can be mixed and matched according to what each young person wants, therefore offering flexibility.

Success at post-16 looks different for every student but we aim to decrease the adult support provided to our students in their academic learning and personal skills so that they will be able to function as independently as possible in their day to day life.

This may even mean that in the future they can move on to educational settings with decreased support or into the world of work. Achievement is valued and all students should leave The Grove with nationally recognised awards. These may include ASDAN awards, AQA Awards and Entry Level 1–3 Award, Certificate or Diploma. Students, their families and staff work together to create a timetable that takes into account student engagement, aspirations and interests.

Transition Planning

At The Grove we believe that a clear transition path to post 16 and beyond is important for our students, their families and the school. Having an effective system in place allows our students a smooth transition year upon year. For this reason the transition process at The Grove starts at the end of key stage 3 in year 9.

A Transition towards Adulthood plan (appendix 1) is created based around five key areas:

  • Academic
  • Employment
  • Independent Living
  • Friends, Community and Relationships
  • Good Health

(For more information visit: https://www.preparingforadulthood.org.uk/)

The planning process takes place as follows;

Year 9 A PCP review is held where the student, family, school and professionals work together to complete the school’s Transition Plan Towards Adulthood. It is during this meeting that we work collaboratively to develop the key targets and milestones for each student taking account of their EHCP outcomes and their aspirations for their future.
Year 10 Review and update planning for KS4 outcomes
Year 11 A PCP review gathers information and this is used to ensure the appropriate pathways are identified for Post 16.
Year 12 Review and update planning and progress at Post 16
Year 13 A PCP review gathers information which is used to ensure strategies and supports have been updated in planning for beyond school and towards adulthood. Under the mental capacity act (2005) student’s views are counted as central to this review and will form the shaping of the pathway for year 14.
Year 14 Review to discuss progress and next steps. Students, families, staff, professionals and external services meet to ensure a successful transition beyond school.

A PCP review is a way we can get information about a young person that they agree with. The meeting is structured so the young person can be as involved in this as possible and their views can be heard. It should be a positive meeting that makes them feel good about themselves, the adults they work with and their school. A PCP meeting includes developing a profile of the individual which lists their aspirations, likes and dislikes, special interests, trigger for anxiety or behaviours, sensory needs, communication needs, things that motivate them etc.

The following people may be invited to a PCP meeting:

  • The young person
  • Parents/carers
  • The team members involved (therapists, teachers, TAs, social workers etc).
  • Friends of the young person.

Flexible Pathways

Pathways are planned around the needs of the student. Some students may work within two pathways to reflect their ‘spikey’ learning profiles. In each case all our our post-16 students will learn through daily access to the community by;

  • The use of public transport
  • The use of shops and public services
  • The use of cafes and restaurants
  • The use of community sport and leisure facilities
  • Visiting a variety of places both locally and further afield, such as; parks, museums, libraries, banks, hairdressers, cinema, recycling centre, dentists and so on.
  • Accessing local colleges and schools and by attending work experience placements

Suggested Pathway offers available at Post-16

Pathway 1:   This pathway is ideal for students who are working in our semi-formal curriculum and towards early stages of our formal curriculum, usually those students with complex needs relating to their autism and associated learning difficulties. Students may be non-verbal and may be within the SCERTS social partner or language partner stage.
The elements in each student’s programme of study can be drawn from the five key areas:

Academic

  • Core skills developed as outlined within the   student’s Transition Plan Towards Adulthood.
  • Pre-entry qualifications. Students take part in a range of ASDAN Towards Independence Courses and AQA Entry Courses that may cover a wide range of learning in both core skills and Life Skills (as outlined in the Transition towards Adulthood plan).
  • Functional Literacy, Numeracy and ICT with a large proportion of learning taking place in the community.
  • College access. Students will experience courses at Haringey 6th form and participate within the LLDD centre and also have experiences cross centre.
  • AQA Awards provide vocational and practical learning through activities such as horticulture at our allotment.

Employment

  • ASDAN Employability provide the opportunity to contribute to the life of the school through participation in in-house or external work experience and short projects through Yong Enterprise.
  • Experiences of the world of work through mini enterprise

Independent Living

  • Life Skills curriculum modules through ASDAN Towards Independence.
  • Residential experiences to develop independence & life skills

Friends, Community and Relationships

  • Integrated support for functional living, including communication, through multidisciplinary teams
  • Relationships and sex education
  • A personalised programme of study generally weighted more towards Personal & Social Development (PSD)

Good Health

  • A wide range of sport & leisure activities to promote good health, proprioceptive and motor development, self-occupancy skills, and relationships with others

 

Pathway 2: This pathway is ideal for students who are working in very early stages of our formal curriculum or entry level 1, usually those students with complex needs relating to their autism and moderate learning difficulties. Students may be typically verbal and may be within the SCERTS language partner or conversational partner stage.
Academic

  • Core skills developed as outlined within the   student’s Transition Plan Towards Adulthood.
  • Functional Literacy, Numeracy and ICT with a large proportion of learning taking place in the community.
  • College access. Students will experience courses at Haringey 6th form and participate within the LLDD centre and also have experiences cross centre.

Employment

  • External work experience and short projects through Yong Enterprise.
  • Accredited world of work modules through OCR Life and Living
  • AQA Awards provide vocational and practical learning such as horticulture at our allotment and shop.

Independent Living

  • Life Skills curriculum modules through OCR Life and Living Skills.
  • Residential experiences to develop independence & life skills

Friends, Community and Relationships

  • Integrated support for functional living, including communication, through multidisciplinary teams
  • Relationships and sex education
  • Personal skills development through modules in OCR Life and Living.

Good Health

  • A wide range of sport & leisure activities to promote good health, proprioceptive and motor development, self-occupancy skills, and relationships with others
  • School mentoring

 

Pathway 3: This pathway is ideal for students who are working within our formal curriculum and entry levels 2–3, usually those students with moderate needs relating to their autism and moderate learning difficulties. Students may be typically verbal and may be within the SCERTS conversational partner stage.
Academic

  • Core skills developed as outlined within the student’s Transition Plan Towards Adulthood.
  • Functional Literacy, Numeracy and ICT with a large proportion of learning taking place in the community.
  • Entry Levels English, Maths.
  • College access. Students will attend short, cross centre vocational and functional courses at Haringey 6th form centre.

Employment

  • External work experiences and short projects through Yong Enterprise.
  • Accredited world of work modules through OCR Life and Living
  • Options to work within Project Search or Care Trade schemes

Independent Living

  • Life Skills curriculum modules through OCR Life and Living Skills.
  • Residential experiences to develop independence & life skills

Friends, Community and Relationships

Good Health

  • A wide range of sport & leisure activities to promote good health, proprioceptive and motor development, self-occupancy skills, and relationships with others
  • School mentoring

Post-16 Pathways Curriculum
View and download (pdf)

Typical Timetable Coverage

Academic Skills

(5 hrs or 20%)

 

College & Vocational Studies

(5 hrs or 20%)

 

Work Experience (3 hrs or 12%) Life Skills & PLP Targets (3 hrs or 12%) OCR Life and Living Skills

(5 hrs or 20%)

PHSCE and RSE (2 hrs or 8%) Sport & Leisure (2 hrs or 8%)

Within the post-16 provision, students, staff and families work together to create a bespoke timetable that includes sessions that cover the courses chosen. They will begin following their bespoke timetables at the beginning of year 12, or when they are deemed ready to do so.

Transition planning engages external professionals and bodies, such as colleges, Local Authority, Connexions, CAMHS, Parent Partnerships, social care staff or other persons relevant to each individual, to smooth the change of setting at the end of the learner’s placement with us.

At the end of their time in the post 16 provision, students will take part in a ‘graduation’ ceremony, where their achievements will be celebrated by their families, staff and peers.

Extra Provision and Interventions

While the desired outcome for students is greater student independence, targeted support remains in place to help the students achieve this. This support includes:

  • The Mentoring Program: We will use two approaches to guide us in the mentoring programmes; Edward De Bono’s ‘Thinking Hats’ which gives our very visual learners a way of shifting perspectives that they can picture in mind, and the NAS student mentor guidelines ‘Supporting Students on the Autism Spectrum’ to lay out roles and signpost useful resources. These approaches link with the young person’s EHCP and personal programme in identifying and working on person centred led targets.

Mentoring is offered as a means of developing competencies for success for students working above entry level 1 and will focus on problem solving; self-study and organisational skills and staying safe and happy, in readiness for further study and employability.

  • College support: We provide support in college programs however the aim is to decrease this support over time in order to promote independence.
  • SCERTS framework continues to provide focused areas of learning to support personal development, communication and wellbeing.
  • Integrated OT support: Through the teaching of practical lessons, the OT supports students in acquiring functional life skills.
  • Communication skills with SALT – The SALT continues to support student progress in social communication skills.
  • Support for well being through a range of therapies such as music therapy.